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Sociology

Teachers: 

Miss S Messenger

 

Sociology, in a nutshell, is the study of society and the groups of people in it. It looks at social groups and how they interact with each other and behave, as well as how 'forces' of society can influence and change people’s behaviour.

Sociology GCSE is split into two parts; Unit 1 and Unit 2.

Both parts have an exam and there is no coursework!

Unit 1: Studying Society, Families and Households and Education

Unit 2: Crime and Deviance, Mass Media and Social Differentiation and Inequalities.

 

Both exams for Unit 1 and Unit 2 are taken in June at the end on Year 11.

 

Homework:

As GCSE students, you will be required to do wider reading as part of the course. Some reading will be directed and provided for you, other   reading you will have to research and make notes yourselves.

 

You will also have to submit an ‘Investigation’ which contains some of your wider reading and research, your own data collection as well as articles from the newspapers and online.

 

This is where you experience being a real sociologist, by doing your own research into human   behaviour and society.

 

You will also submit one long essay every six weeks as formal assessment, as well as practise exam questions either in class or as part of your homework.

 

What else do we do? We have been on several trips to Dover town centre for data collection, where students ask members of the public to fill in their questionnaires or to take part in interviews for their individual investigations.

 

We also frequently do group work, presentations, leaflets, posters, debates and display work.

 

Extra help and support is available for those who wish to have extra lessons or help with examination techniques on Thursdays after College (3.30pm to 4.30pm).

 

GCSE Sociology can be used as a stepping stone to Further and Higher Education (such as A-Levels), as well as employment requiring Level 2 qualifications, such as:

 

Prison Service; Social Work; Government Worker; Social    Researcher; Police Force;    Working with Aid Agencies; Criminal Justice Sector; Teacher; Working with vulnerable adults/children; Human Relations Consultant; Institutional Analyst; Criminologist; Family Services Specialist; Demographer; Clinical Sociologist; Community Service Agency Worker... Just to name a few!

 

 

Sociology at A-Level

AS-Level:

Age range: 16 - 19
Entry Requirements: 4 GCSEs at C or above.

 

Description:

Sociology is simply the study of people and society. It looks at social groups and how they interact with each other and behave, as well as how 'forces' of society can influence and change peoples' behaviour. Sociology asks: Why are things like they are? How do they change? Why do they change? What makes us who we are? What is 'Identity'? What is Culture? These are only a few of the questions that we study.


At AS-Level, You will be completing 2 units of which will be examined.
Unit 1 is ‘Families and Households'. This encompasses several topics such as- Divorce rates, different family types in Britain today, the impact of Ethnic Minority Groups on the family structure, the ageing population and much more.


Unit 2 is 'Education', with an element of Sociological Methods. This involves the study of the British education system, focusing on differences in attainment amongst the main social groups: ethnicity, gender and social class; history of the education system; educational policies; Sociological theory relating to the role of education in society and student attainment; state versus public education; the debate surrounding the controversial dual selection system in Kent; league tables and Ofsted and how this links to student attainment.


The Sociological Methods element involves studying methods of research, their advantages and disadvantages, the distinction between secondary and primary data and the considerations that influence the choice of methods used and the way that the research is carried out.

Enrichment:

We are hoping to attend Student Conferences in London and at Canterbury Christ Church University to help with examination techniques and take some trips outside of the classroom setting to enhance your sociological understanding.

 

 

A2-Level:

Age range: 16 - 19

Entry Requirements: 4 GCSEs at C or above and completed the AS in Sociology

 

Description: Sociology is simply the study of people and society. It looks at groups of people and how they interact with each other and behave, as well as how the 'forces' of society can influence and change peoples' behaviour.


At A-Level, you will be completing a further 2 units after completing your AS-Level in Sociology.
Unit 3 is 'Global Development'. This encompasses Globalisation, Third World Poverty, Charitable Aid, Different Theories of Development, Underdevelopment and Global Inequality, World Trade, Industrialisation, the Global Environment and Demographic Change.


Unit 4 is ‘Crime and Deviance’ with a Theory and Methods element. In Crime and Deviance we study theories of Crime and Deviance, Social Order and Social Control and discuss whether deviance is actually a good thing, Social Distribution of Crime, Globalisation and Crime in Contemporary Society, Crime Control, Prevention and Punishment including Capital Punishment. Also included is the Sociological Explanation of Suicide.


The Theory and Methods element of the exam includes methods of research, secondary and primary data distinctions and sociological methods and in depth understanding of the theories underlying Sociology.

Enrichment:

We hope to attend Student Conferences at Canterbury Christ Church University as part of preparation for the examination, along with relevant trips outside of the classroom.
 

What happens when you have finished?

 

What other learning could you do:

A-Level Sociology can be used as a stepping stone to Further and Higher Education, as well as employment requiring Level 3 qualifications, such as: Prison Service; Social Work; Government Worker; Social Researcher; Police Force; Working with Aid Agencies; Criminal Justice Sector; Teacher; Working with vulnerable adults/children; Human Relations Consultant; Institutional Analyst; Criminologist; Family Services Specialist; Demographer; Clinical Sociologist; Community Service Agency Worker.

 


 

 

 

 

 

Useful Links:

          AQA

          S-Cool Sociology Revision 

          Education Forum 

          BBC News

          'thinking allowed' BBC Radio 4

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